The Effects of Local Vibration and Cervical Stabilization Exercises Applied on Neck Muscles on Balance in Healthy Individuals

The Effects of Local Vibration and Cervical Stabilization Exercises Applied on Neck Muscles on Balance in Healthy Individuals



Sponsors

Lead Sponsor



Source

Hacettepe University

Oversight Info

Has Dmc

No

Is Fda Regulated Drug

No

Is Fda Regulated Device

No


Brief Summary

In healthy individuals, many postural musculoskeletal problems arise due to various reasons.
The cervical region is the region where these problems are most common. The cervical region
ranks second in the general population after the lumbal area of musculoskeletal system
disorders and affects close to 70% of the general population.The most important causes of
this posture disorder are; muscular performance and strength are inadequate, as well as
decreased proprioception of the muscles, deterioration of the individual balance systems that
result in individual visual or vestibular problems.

Exercise therapy is at the forefront of these methods, while a variety of methods are applied
in the prevention and treatment of neck problems. Recent studies have focused on multifaceted
treatments including exercises to improve strength, endurance and coordination of cervical
muscles, proprioceptive training, relaxation exercises to prevent muscle tension,
stabilization exercises and behavior modification. Cervical stabilization exercises are a
frequently used exercise approach. Cervical stabilization exercises, which are different from
ordinary exercises, are based on biomechanics, neurophysiology and physiotherapy research.
The main objective of this method is; improve body awareness, maintain posture uniformity,
improve strength, endurance, coordination and proprioception. Stabilization exercises also
increase the strength and endurance of the postural and stabilizer muscles, improving
stability control in the stabilized and non-stabilized positions.

Another method that contributes to the development of balance and proprioceptive sense is
vibration application. Proprioception plays an important role in ensuring the coordination of
movements. When the proprioception input is disturbed, both the position sense and the speed
of movement may be affected. Muscle-tendon vibration is a noninvasive method that is often
used in proprioception studies. It has been suggested that the vibration application are the
enhancing effect of the proprioceptive. However, there is not enough research on this
subject.

The purpose of this study is to determine whether the cervical stabilization exercises to be
applied to the cervical region and the local vibration applied to the neck muscles are
related to muscle performance, proprioception and balance and their superiority with each
other.

Overall Status

Completed

Start Date

2016-03-12

Completion Date

2017-01-02

Primary Completion Date

2016-11-15

Phase

N/A

Study Type

Interventional

Primary Outcome

Measure

Time Frame

Sensory Organization Test
SOT was used to assess changes in visual, vestibular, and somatosensory balance of individuals at eighth week.

Secondary Outcome

Measure

Time Frame

Head Shake Sensory Organization Test (HS-SOT)
HS-SOT was used to assess changes only vestibular balance of individuals at eighth week.

Enrollment

16

Conditions


Intervention

Intervention Type

Device

Intervention Name


Description

Local vibration device applied on neck muscles for 8 weeks

Arm Group Label

Vibration Group


Intervention Type

Behavioral

Intervention Name


Description

Cervical stabilization exercises performed by healty individuals for 8 weeks

Arm Group Label

Stabilization Group



Eligibility

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

- Individuals who have not had neck pain in the last six months.

Exclusion Criteria:

- Patients with atypical spinal cord anomalies, inflammatory or rheumatologic disorders,
malignancy history, radiculopathy, myelopathy or other neurological disorders,
vestibular disorders, and vertebral trauma history who underwent any surgical
treatment for vertebral colonic at least 3 months before, was not included in the
study.

Gender

Male

Minimum Age

18 Years

Maximum Age

30 Years

Healthy Volunteers

Accepts Healthy Volunteers


Verification Date

2018-03-01

Lastchanged Date

N/A

Firstreceived Date

N/A

Responsible Party

Responsible Party Type

Principal Investigator

Investigator Affiliation

Hacettepe University

Investigator Full Name

Ceyhun Turkmen

Investigator Title

Research Assistant


Keywords


Has Expanded Access

No

Condition Browse


Number Of Arms

3

Arm Group

Arm Group Label

Vibration Group

Arm Group Type

Active Comparator

Description

Local vibration on neck muscles


Arm Group Label

Stabilization Group

Arm Group Type

Active Comparator

Description

Cervical stabilization exercises on cervical region


Arm Group Label

Control Group

Arm Group Type

No Intervention

Description

Individuals performed only daily living activities



Results Reference

Citation

Boyd-Clark LC, Briggs CA, Galea MP. Muscle spindle distribution, morphology, and density in longus colli and multifidus muscles of the cervical spine. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Apr 1;27(7):694-701.

PMID

11923661


Citation

Peterson BW, Goldberg J, Bilotto G, Fuller JH. Cervicocollic reflex: its dynamic properties and interaction with vestibular reflexes. J Neurophysiol. 1985 Jul;54(1):90-109.

PMID

3162006


Citation

Jull GA, Richardson CA. Motor control problems in patients with spinal pain: a new direction for therapeutic exercise. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2000 Feb;23(2):115-7. Review.

PMID

10714539


Citation

Panjabi MM. The stabilizing system of the spine. Part I. Function, dysfunction, adaptation, and enhancement. J Spinal Disord. 1992 Dec;5(4):383-9; discussion 397.

PMID

1490034


Citation

Adams M. Re: Spine stability: the six blind men and the elephant. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2007 May;22(4):486; author reply 487-8. Epub 2007 Feb 16.

PMID

17306912


Citation

Beinert K, Keller M, Taube W. Neck muscle vibration can improve sensorimotor function in patients with neck pain. Spine J. 2015 Mar 1;15(3):514-21. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2014.10.013. Epub 2014 Oct 22.

PMID

25452010


Citation

Brumagne S, Cordo P, Lysens R, Verschueren S, Swinnen S. The role of paraspinal muscle spindles in lumbosacral position sense in individuals with and without low back pain. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Apr 15;25(8):989-94.

PMID

10767813


Citation

Bosco C, Colli R, Introini E, Cardinale M, Tsarpela O, Madella A, Tihanyi J, Viru A. Adaptive responses of human skeletal muscle to vibration exposure. Clin Physiol. 1999 Mar;19(2):183-7.

PMID

10200901


Citation

Cardinale M, Bosco C. The use of vibration as an exercise intervention. Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2003 Jan;31(1):3-7. Review.

PMID

12562163


Citation

Torvinen S, Kannus P, Sievänen H, Järvinen TA, Pasanen M, Kontulainen S, Järvinen TL, Järvinen M, Oja P, Vuori I. Effect of four-month vertical whole body vibration on performance and balance. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Sep;34(9):1523-8.

PMID

12218749


Citation

Bruyere O, Wuidart MA, Di Palma E, Gourlay M, Ethgen O, Richy F, Reginster JY. Controlled whole body vibration to decrease fall risk and improve health-related quality of life of nursing home residents. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005 Feb;86(2):303-7.

PMID

15706558


Citation

Cheng CF, Cheng KH, Lee YM, Huang HW, Kuo YH, Lee HJ. Improvement in running economy after 8 weeks of whole-body vibration training. J Strength Cond Res. 2012 Dec;26(12):3349-57. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31824e0eb1.

PMID

22344045


Citation

Yong MS, Lee HY, Ryu YU, Lee MY. Effects of craniocervical flexion exercise on upper-limb postural stability during a goal-directed pointing task. J Phys Ther Sci. 2015 Jun;27(6):2005-7. doi: 10.1589/jpts.27.2005. Epub 2015 Jun 30.

PMID

26180368


Citation

Wrisley DM, Stephens MJ, Mosley S, Wojnowski A, Duffy J, Burkard R. Learning effects of repetitive administrations of the sensory organization test in healthy young adults. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Aug;88(8):1049-54.

PMID

17678669



Firstreceived Results Date

N/A

Patient Data

Sharing Ipd

Undecided


Firstreceived Results Disposition Date

N/A

Study Design Info

Allocation

Randomized

Intervention Model

Parallel Assignment

Primary Purpose

Treatment


Study First Submitted

February 27, 2018

Study First Submitted Qc

March 12, 2018

Study First Posted

March 13, 2018

Last Update Submitted

March 12, 2018

Last Update Submitted Qc

March 12, 2018

Last Update Posted

March 13, 2018


ClinicalTrials.gov processed this data on August 29, 2018

Conditions

Conditions usually refer to a disease, disorder, syndrome, illness, or injury. In ClinicalTrials.gov, conditions include any health issue worth studying, such as lifespan, quality of life, health risks, etc.
Interventions

Interventions refer to the drug, vaccine, procedure, device, or other potential treatment being studied. Interventions can also include less intrusive possibilities such as surveys, education, and interviews.
Study Phase

Most clinical trials are designated as phase 1, 2, 3, or 4, based on the type of questions that study is seeking to answer:

In Phase 1 (Phase I) clinical trials, researchers test a new drug or treatment in a small group of people (20-80) for the first time to evaluate its safety, determine a safe dosage range, and identify side effects.

In Phase 2 (Phase II) clinical trials, the study drug or treatment is given to a larger group of people (100-300) to see if it is effective and to further evaluate its safety.

In Phase 3 (Phase III) clinical trials, the study drug or treatment is given to large groups of people (1,000-3,000) to confirm its effectiveness, monitor side effects, compare it to commonly used treatments, and collect information that will allow the drug or treatment to be used safely.

In Phase 4 (Phase IV) clinical trials, post marketing studies delineate additional information including the drug's risks, benefits, and optimal use.

These phases are defined by the Food and Drug Administration in the Code of Federal Regulations.



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