Large-Scale Online Studies of Early Motor Skill Learning

Large-Scale Online Studies of Early Motor Skill Learning

Patrocinadores

Patrocinador principal: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Fuente National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Resumen breve

Background:

Our goal is to gain insight into early human motor skill learning by carrying out online substudies using online crowd-sourcing tools.

Objective:

To learn more about motor behavior in a large group of people using motor tasks, and questions.

Eligibility:

Adults ages 18 and older based in the U.S. who speak English

Design:

Participants will be recruited from a crowd-sourcing website like Amazon Mechanical Turk.

Participants will do online tasks. They can use their own computers anywhere with Internet access. They will not need to directly interact with researchers.

Participants will be asked for general data, like their age and gender. No personally identifiable data will be collected.

Participants will see a list of tasks on their computer screen. They will be able to choose tasks they wish to do. They will get a description of the experiment, how long it takes, and how much compensation they will get.

Participants will complete on their screen a motor behavioral task, a cognitive task, and/or a questionnaire. For example, they may be asked to press sequences of numbers on the keyboard or move the mouse when a stimulus appears on the screen. Experiments may last up to 1 hour.

Participants can complete as many experiments as they wish. They can quit at any point.

Descripción detallada

Objective:

Our overall goal in this protocol has been to gain insight into early motor skill learning (micro-learning) in large-scale healthy volunteer cohorts using online crowdsourcing. We have used a simple keyboard typing task to study micro-offline performance improvements during early motor skill learning. This online approach limits the burden on participants (who perform tasks in the comfort of their homes instead of traveling to NIH) and substantially reduces burden on in-house human, financial and technical resources. Results from this protocol contribute to a better understanding of factors relevant to human motor skill learning, with important implications for the design of better motor learning and neurorehabilitative strategies after brain lesions. We had completed data collection for four aims under this protocol at the time we were informed by the NIH IRB that they determined this to be a thematic protocol (September 23, 2019).

The four specific aims addressed under this protocol are:

1. Aim 1. To validate a motor skill learning task previously used by our group in lab-based studies {Bonstrup, 2019 #36} within an online, crowd-sourcing platform.

2. Aim 2. To compare the influence of an interfering task applied during early ("early interference") vs late ("late interference") rest periods on motor learning, thus evaluating resistance to interference, a feature of consolidation.

3. Aim 3. To evaluate the effects of a shorter practice period duration (i.e. - 5s vs. previously studied 10s duration) on micro-offline motor learning to gain insight into the impact of fatigue-related factors on learning.

4. Aim 4. To evaluate the effects of randomly variable practice period durations between 5-10s in length on micro-offline gains

As instructed, the purpose of this amendment is to request authorization to proceed with data analysis and publication. No new experiments will be carried out under this protocol.

Study Population:

U.S.-based English speakers aged 18 and above were recruited under this minimal risk protocol. Participants completed an online task in the comfort of their own homes using the internet, and did not need to directly interact with the investigators. All participants were given an anonymized random ID by the on-line site. We did collect general demographic information including age (needed to determine elegibility), and gender, race and ethnicity (per IRB reporting requirements, i.e. - Cumulative Inclusion Enrollment Report). However, we did not collect personally identifiable information (PII) about the participants.

Design:

Under this protocol, we have conducted experiments supporting four aims using Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT). All experiments consisted of a brief keyboard typing task where participants were asked to repeatedly type a 5-key sequence (4-1-3-2-4) as fast and as accurately as possible for several seconds (i.e. - practice trial). Each practice trial was followed by a rest period lasting several seconds. Following the task, participants completed a short questionnaire designed to query compliance with task instructions, and collect general demographic data required for IRB reporting. The average total time for participation across all experiments was approximately 20 minutes.

Outcome Measures:

The primary outcome measures for the keyboard typing task were correct sequence typing speed and typing accuracy. Microlearning scores were derived by quantifying the speed change between the end of a previous practice trial and the beginning of the subsequent one (micro-offline learning) and the speed difference between the beginning and end of the same practice trial (micro-online learning). Information from the questionaires related to task instruction compliance was primarily used to exclude data from further analysis if needed.

Estado general Completed
Fecha de inicio January 9, 2019
Fecha de Terminación October 17, 2019
Fecha de finalización primaria September 23, 2019
Fase N/A
Tipo de estudio Interventional
Resultado primario
Medida Periodo de tiempo
The primary outcome measures for the keyboard typing task were correct sequence typing speed and typing accuracy. After completion
Inscripción 2529
Condición
Intervención

Tipo de intervención: Behavioral

Nombre de intervención: repetitive sequence keyboard typing task

Descripción: Participants learned to type a repetitive numeric sequence in varying ways using Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) platform

Etiqueta de grupo de brazo: Healthy Volunteers

Tipo de intervención: Behavioral

Nombre de intervención: Questionnaire

Descripción: Questionnaire to query compliance with task instructions, and collect general demographic data

Etiqueta de grupo de brazo: Healthy Volunteers

Elegibilidad

Criterios:

- INCLUSION CRITERIA:

U.S.-based English speakers greater than 18 years of age are eligible to participate in the study.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Subjects are excluded if they are less than 18 years of age. NIH and NINDS employees are not excluded from the study, since participation is anonymous and personal identifiers unknown to the experimenters.

Género: All

Edad mínima: 18 Years

Edad máxima: N/A

Voluntarios Saludables: No

Oficial general
Apellido Papel Afiliación
Leonardo G Cohen, M.D. Principal Investigator National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Ubicación
Instalaciones: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Ubicacion Paises

United States

Fecha de verificación

August 5, 2020

Fiesta responsable

Tipo: Sponsor

Palabras clave
Tiene acceso ampliado No
Número de brazos 1
Grupo de brazo

Etiqueta: Healthy Volunteers

Tipo: Active Comparator

Descripción: ages 18 and older

Información de diseño del estudio

Asignación: Non-Randomized

Modelo de intervención: Parallel Assignment

Propósito primario: Other

Enmascaramiento: None (Open Label)

Fuente: ClinicalTrials.gov