Disease Natural History and Biomarkers of SPG3A, SPG4A, and SPG31

Disease Natural History and Biomarkers of SPG3A, SPG4 and SPG31

Sponsors

Lead Sponsor: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Source National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Brief Summary

Background: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) usually progresses slowly. Researchers want to learn more about how its symptoms change over time. They want to look for changes in the blood and cells of people with the most common forms of HSP that might allow them to better understand the disease. Objectives: To learn more about common forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia and find out how it progresses over time. Eligibility: People age 7 and older with SPG3A, SPG4A, or SPG31 Design: Participants will have 1 two-hour visit each year for up to 5 years. At 1 visit, adult participants may have a skin biopsy. An area of skin will be numbed then a tool will remove a small piece of skin. At all visits, all participants will have a physical exam and blood drawn. At all visits, participants will do a few tasks like walking quickly and climbing stairs. Participants can give permission for their skin cells, DNA samples, and data to be used in other studies. The samples and data will have no identifying information.

Detailed Description

The Neurogenetics Branch (NGB) within the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is conducting a study to evaluate patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia types 3A, 4 and 31. The objective of this study is to understand disease progression in these closely related forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia using validated rating scales such as the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale (SPRS), and Medical Outcomes Study Questionnaire Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). We also hope to develop biomarkers that could be used in future treatment trials from human serum and by utilizing transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to determine central motor conduction times and resting motor thresholds. OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this protocol is to study the natural history of the most common forms of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia. The information obtained from validated rating scales (SPRS and SF-36), TMS, and serum biomarkers, will allow for the development of treatment trials. In some cases, blood or other biologic samples (including skin biopsies) will be obtained for future laboratory studies. STUDY POPULATION The number of participants to be enrolled will be set to 300. DESIGN This is an observational study of autosomal dominant forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia progression, pathophysiology, and biomarkers. OUTCOME MEASURES In this study we will track disease progression using the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale (SPRS) and SF-36. Also, we will measure levels of plasma lipids, insulin, leptin, and of certain micro RNAs to investigate their utility as biomarkers. We will utilize TMS (combined with nerve conducting studies) to assess central motor conduction times (CMCT) and resting motor thresholds (RMT).

Overall Status Terminated
Start Date 2016-11-18
Completion Date 2020-10-16
Primary Completion Date 2020-10-16
Study Type Observational
Primary Outcome
Measure Time Frame
Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale (SPRS) Once a year for five years
SF-36 Once a year for five years
Secondary Outcome
Measure Time Frame
Cortical silent period Once a year for five years
CMCT, resting motor thresholds, MEP amplitude and MEP latency Once a year for five years
miRNA relative quantity. Once a year for five years
Fasting Triglycerides, total Cholesterol, HDL and LDL, Leptin, Insulin levels. Once a year for five years
Enrollment 51
Condition
Eligibility

Sampling Method:

Non-Probability Sample

Criteria:

- INCLUSION CRITERIA: - 7 years or older. - Proven genetic diagnosis or variant of unknown significance considered by the Principal Investigator (PI) to be likely pathogenic at genomic loci associated with SPG3A, SPG4 and SPG31. - For the subcomponent involving transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) / nerve conduction studies, patients must be greater than or equal to 18 years of age and would be willing to undergo the procedure. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: - Adults unable to provide consent or minors without a parent or a guardian. - Unwillingness to consent for collection of biological samples or their cryopreservation. - Any bleeding disorder that would prevent or present any danger either during blood extraction or skin biopsy, such hemophilia, or the long-term use of anticoagulants such as Coumadin. - For the subcomponent of this study involving transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), performed with nerve conduction studies: - Patients under 18 years of age. - Patients withwith implanted devices, such as pacemakers, pumps or stimulators. - Patients withor metal in the cranium (excluding dental work) or eye. - Patients with known seizure disorder. - Patients who are unwilling or unable to participate.

Gender:

All

Minimum Age:

7 Years

Maximum Age:

N/A

Healthy Volunteers:

No

Overall Official
Last Name Role Affiliation
Craig D Blackstone, M.D. Principal Investigator National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Location
Facility: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Location Countries

United States

Verification Date

2020-10-01

Responsible Party

Type: Sponsor

Keywords
Has Expanded Access No
Condition Browse
Arm Group

Label: Patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP)

Description: Patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia types 3A, 4 and 31.

Study Design Info

Observational Model: Cohort

Time Perspective: Prospective

This information was retrieved directly from the website clinicaltrials.gov without any changes. If you have any requests to change, remove or update your study details, please contact [email protected]. As soon as a change is implemented on clinicaltrials.gov, this will be updated automatically on our website as well.

Clinical Research News