Baby's First Bites: Promoting Vegetable Intake in Infants and Toddlers

The What and How in Weaning: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess the Effects of Vegetable-exposure and Responsive Feeding on Vegetable Acceptance in Infants and Toddlers

Patrocinadores

Patrocinador principal: Universiteit Leiden

Colaborador: Wageningen University
Danone Research
Nutricia, Inc.

Fuente Universiteit Leiden
Resumen breve

Overweight and obesity in preschool children is more and more common and predicts overweight in later childhood and adulthood. A healthy eating pattern with many vegetables decreases the risk to develop overweight. As many food preferences are learned in the first years of life, teaching children to like vegetables from the very start of eating solid foods is essential. Starting baby's first bites of solid foods with vegetables instead of more sweet tastes like fruits may promote vegetable liking. Also, it is important that parents know how to feed their children: e.g., paying attention to whether the child is hungry or full is essential, as is not pressuring them to eat. What is yet unknown is which of these two are more important to promote, to facilitate vegetable liking in young children. Is starting with vegetables most important, or educating parents on their feeding-techniques? And is a combination of both most effective? This study tests which of three interventions is most effective to promote vegetable intake and liking in children up until the age of 3 years: a) a focus on the 'what' (starting with vegetables); b) a focus on the 'how' (listen to your child's cues while feeding); c) a focus on both the 'what' and the 'how'. These three groups will be compared to a control group receiving no advice on how to introduce solid foods on children's vegetable intake and liking.

Descripción detallada

The weaning period in infancy is an important time for introducing healthy eating patterns that include vegetables to protect children against the development of overweight. There is evidence that it is important what weaning infants are offered: starting exclusively with vegetables is more successful for the promotion of vegetable acceptance than starting with fruits. There is also evidence that it is important how infants are weaned: responsive feeding characterised by sensitive responses to infant cues during feeding fosters healthy eating. However, the what and the how of infant weaning have never been experimentally tested in the same study to determine their relative importance for fostering vegetable acceptance, nor have they been combined to test whether a focus on both may be superior to each approach separately. This study employs a randomised controlled design testing the effectiveness of (a) a focus on the what in weaning, i.e., a vegetable-exposure intervention; (b) a focus on the how in weaning, i.e., an intervention to enhance responsive feeding; (c) a combined focus on what and how in weaning in an integrated intervention; (d) an attention-control group. Vegetable acceptance will be measured before and directly after the interventions when the child is 18 months of age, and when the child is 24 and 36 months of age. The proposed study is based on a unique integration of expert knowledge from the field of nutrition and the field of parenting, which will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the development of vegetable acceptance in infants, and ultimately the prevention of overweight.

Estado general Active, not recruiting
Fecha de inicio May 11, 2016
Fecha de Terminación July 2020
Fecha de finalización primaria July 2020
Fase N/A
Tipo de estudio Interventional
Resultado primario
Medida Periodo de tiempo
Change in vegetable intake Measured at child age of 4-6 months (prior to intervention), 18 months (directly after intervention) and at child age of 24 and 36 months (6 and 18 months follow-up)
Change in vegetable liking Measured at child age of 4-6 months (prior to intervention), 18 months (directly after intervention) and at child age of 24 and 36 months (6 and 18 months follow-up)
Child self-regulation of energy intake Measured at child age of 18 months
Change in child self-regulation of energy intake Measured at child age of 4-6 months (prior to intervention), 18 months (directly after intervention) and at child age of 24 and 36 months (6 and 18 months follow-up)
Resultado secundario
Medida Periodo de tiempo
Change in child eating behavior Measured at child age of 4-6 months (prior to intervention), 18 months (directly after intervention) and at child age of 24 and 36 months (6 and 18 months follow-up)
Change in child anthropometrics Measured at child age of 4-6 months (prior to intervention), 18 months (directly after intervention) and at child age of 24 and 36 months (6 and 18 months follow-up)
Change in self-reported maternal feeding style Measured at child age of 4-6 months (prior to intervention), 18 months (directly after intervention) and at child age of 24 and 36 months (6 and 18 months follow-up)
Change in observed maternal feeding style Measured at child age of 4-6 months (prior to intervention), 18 months (directly after intervention) and at child age of 24 and 36 months (6 and 18 months follow-up)
Inscripción 255
Condición
Intervención

Tipo de intervención: Other

Nombre de intervención: Vegetable exposure

Descripción: Repeated exposure to variety of vegetables

Tipo de intervención: Behavioral

Nombre de intervención: VIPP-Feeding Infants

Descripción: Promoting responsive feeding practices

Tipo de intervención: Other

Nombre de intervención: Control

Descripción: Phone calls with mother about development of child, no advice on complementary feeding

Etiqueta de grupo de brazo: Control

Elegibilidad

Criterios:

Inclusion Criteria:

First-time mothers of healthy term infants who report to have good reading and writing skills in the Dutch language

Exclusion Criteria:

- Medical problems in the infant that influence the ability to eat

- Major psychiatric problems in the mother, like depression

- Mothers who are not willing to start weaning exclusively with prepared vegetable/fruit purees from the Nutricia brand

- Mothers who are not willing for themselves and/or their infants to be video-taped

Género: All

Edad mínima: 4 Months

Edad máxima: 3 Years

Voluntarios Saludables: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Oficial general
Apellido Papel Afiliación
Judi Mesman, PhD Principal Investigator Leiden University Medical Center
Ubicación
Instalaciones:
Leiden University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Education and Child Studies | Leiden, 2300 RB, Netherlands
Wageningen University, Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences | Wageningen, 6708WE, Netherlands
Ubicacion Paises

Netherlands

Fecha de verificación

September 2019

Fiesta responsable

Tipo: Principal Investigator

Afiliación del investigador: Universiteit Leiden

Nombre completo del investigador: Judi Mesman

Título del investigador: Prof. dr. J. Mesman

Tiene acceso ampliado No
Condición Examinar
Número de brazos 4
Grupo de brazo

Etiqueta: Vegetable exposure

Tipo: Experimental

Descripción: Repeated exposure to a variety of vegetables from the start of complementary feeding

Etiqueta: VIPP-Feeding Infants

Tipo: Experimental

Descripción: Promotion of responsive feeding practices from the start of complementary feeding

Etiqueta: Exposure + VIPP-FI

Tipo: Experimental

Descripción: Combination of repeated exposure to vegetables and promotion of responsive feeding practices

Etiqueta: Control

Tipo: Sham Comparator

Descripción: Phone calls on development child with no information on complementary feeding

Datos del paciente No
Información de diseño del estudio

Asignación: Randomized

Modelo de intervención: Factorial Assignment

Propósito primario: Prevention

Enmascaramiento: Single (Investigator)

Descripción de enmascaramiento: Investigators coding parental outcome measures of the study from videomaterial are masked for study-arm

Fuente: ClinicalTrials.gov