Functional Connectivity Alterations in Suicidal Patients Among Opioid Users

Functional Connectivity Alterations in Suicidal Patients Among Opioid Users

Sponsors

Lead Sponsor: Baylor College of Medicine

Collaborator: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Source Baylor College of Medicine
Brief Summary

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death for Americans of all ages and more people in the United States now die from suicide than die from car accidents. Although death by firearm remains the most common cause of suicide in the United States, an intentional overdose of substance usage such as prescription opioids accounts for over 5,000 suicides per year. In 2017, more than 70,000 drug overdose deaths occurred, making it the leading cause of injury-related death, and well over half (67.8%) involved opioids. The dramatic increase in opioid overdose raises concerns about their contribution to suicidal outcomes (e.g., suicidal behavior, ideation, and attempts). Abuse of prescription opioids is characterized by the persistence of opioid use despite negative consequences. The neurobiology of opioid abuse involves the mesolimbic dopamine systems as the main neural substrate for opioid reward, and altered dopamine release in this system plays a role in opioid abuse. Moreover, the cortico-striatal system, especially the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), has been associated with the abuse of many substances, including opioids and alcohol. Structural brain alterations in frontal areas, particularly the OFC, may cause executive control dysfunctions of mood which are highly associated with suicidal ideation. Recent preclinical work has shown that higher input from the OFC to the dorsal striatum (dSTR) is associated with compulsive reward-seeking behavior despite negative effects (e.g., punishment). In this study, the investigators propose that OFC/dSTR connectivity may be one neural differentiator that distinguishes between those who become compulsive users after initial opioid use and those that do not. Moreover, suicidal patients among those who become compulsive users may have higher OFC/dSTR connectivity compared to non-suicidal patients.

Detailed Description

The OFC is functionally connected to other cortical brain regions (e.g., prefrontal and parietal cortices) but also subcortical areas in the dorsal striatum, a core reward circuitry region. The functional connectivity between the OFC and the dorsal striatum also plays an important role in addiction, particularly opioid abuse, and suicide behaviors. Thus, it is clear that the investigators need a better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms using non-invasive brain stimulation (e.g., TMS) treatment to the OFC as applied to opioid users. As such, the investigators propose to use a combination of interleaved TMS-fMRI, a novel method to observe and characterize causal manipulations of functional neural circuits, targeting the OFC and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to longitudinally study psychiatric symptoms (e.g., opioid craving, suicidal behaviors) changes in opioid users.

Overall Status Recruiting
Start Date 2022-01-04
Completion Date 2026-01-04
Primary Completion Date 2025-01-04
Phase N/A
Study Type Interventional
Primary Outcome
Measure Time Frame
Functional Connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and dorsal striatum in opioid users or opioid-related patients versus healthy subjects 1 day
rTMS changes in dorsal striatum responses between those receiving active stimulation versus sham stimulation 12 days
Enrollment 80
Condition
Intervention

Intervention Type: Device

Intervention Name: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)

Description: 10 Sessions of rTMS - brief single pulse TMS or short TMS pulse bursts consisting of 2-5 pulses delivered per second at a standard intensity. If a brief single pulse TMS is applied, a standard single pulse TMS procedure will be used - This procedure consists of 10 trains of 180 seconds duration and each train will be separated by at least 30 seconds. If short TMS pulse bursts are applied, a standard theta-burst TMS procedure will be used - This procedure consists of TMS triplets (i.e., 3 pulses) that repeat for 10 trains of a total duration of 40-190 seconds and these bursts will be separated by at least 6 seconds and each train will be separated by at least 30 seconds

Arm Group Label: Active rTMS

Intervention Type: Device

Intervention Name: sham rTMS

Description: 10 sessions of sham rTMS

Arm Group Label: Sham rTMS

Eligibility

Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria Opioid Use Patients: Each potential subject will be eligible for inclusion in this study only if the specific criteria listed below are met: - Be male or female aged 18-60 years old - Participation in H-22611; - Meets a World Health Organization Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (WHO-ASSIST) score of 4+ in the opioid category; - Has depressive symptoms according to the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9; - Has active suicidal thoughts according to Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R); - Currently enrolled in The Menninger Clinic; - Be able to verbalize understanding of consent form, able to provide written informed consent, and verbalize willingness to complete study procedures; - Female subjects must be non-nursing and not pregnant at the times of fMRI experiments and rTMS treatment; - Has no contraindications to MRI (pacemaker, cochlear implants, metal in eyes, other metal implants, etc.); Meets the pre-screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) questions provided by the Center for Advanced MR Imaging (CAMRI); - Has no contraindications to TMS (any types of non-removable metal in their head except the mouth, or within 12 inches of the coil, etc.). Inclusion Criteria Healthy Controls: Each potential subject will be eligible for inclusion in this study only if the specific criteria listed below are met: - Be male or female aged 18-60 years old; - No history of severe medical or neurological illnesses per history; - Be able to verbalize understanding of consent form, able to provide written informed consent, and verbalize willingness to complete study procedures; - Female subjects must be non-nursing and not pregnant at the time of fMRI experiments; - Has no contraindications to MRI (pacemaker, cochlear implants, metal in eyes, other metal implants, etc.): Meets the pre-screening MRI questions provided by the Center for Advanced MR Imaging (CAMRI); - Has no contraindications to TMS (any types of non-removable metal in their head except the mouth, or within 12 inches of the TMS coil, etc.). Exclusion Criteria: Any potential subject who meets any of the following criteria will be excluded from participating in the study if s/he has - In the opinion of the clinician and the research team at admission, be expected to fail to complete the study protocol due to probable relocation from The Menninger Clinic area or not tolerable to receive rTMS; - Unable to understand the design and requirements of the study; - Unable to sign informed consent for any reason; - Has an unstable medical condition, including Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), acute hepatitis, active TB, unstable cardiac disease, unstable diabetes, hepatic or renal insufficiency; - Female subjects who are pregnant or nursing; - Contraindications to MRI (pacemaker, cochlear implants, metal in the eye, other metal implants, etc.): Do not meet the pre-screening MRI questions provided by the CAMRI; - Contraindications to the noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) (any types of non- removable metal in their head except the mouth, or within 12 inches of the coil, etc.) Additional exclusion criteria for the TMS experiments are based on the recommendations described by the international consensus panel on brain stimulation; - Non-English speaking subjects (we do not have the staff and resources to include other languages)

Gender:

All

Minimum Age:

18 Years

Maximum Age:

64 Years

Healthy Volunteers:

Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Overall Contact

Last Name: Hyuntaek Oh, PhD

Phone: 713-275-5019

Email: [email protected]

Location
Facility: Status: Contact: The Menninger Clinic Hyuntaek Oh, PhD 713-275-5019 [email protected]
Location Countries

United States

Verification Date

2022-08-01

Responsible Party

Type: Principal Investigator

Investigator Affiliation: Baylor College of Medicine

Investigator Full Name: Hyuntaek Oh, PhD

Investigator Title: Assistant Professor

Has Expanded Access No
Condition Browse
Number Of Arms 2
Arm Group

Label: Active rTMS

Type: Experimental

Description: 10 sessions of active rTMS

Label: Sham rTMS

Type: Sham Comparator

Description: 10 sessions of sham rTMS

Patient Data No
Study Design Info

Allocation: Randomized

Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment

Intervention Model Description: The administration of rTMS will adhere to a double-blinded, randomized, controlled design with 50% of the opioid users or opioid-related patients (e.g., suicidal or depressive patients) recruited to the study receiving placebo stimulation (sham) instead of active rTMS. The placebo stimulation will use a TMS coil of identical appearance that is designed to mimic the sensations associated with the active TMS coil.

Primary Purpose: Treatment

Masking: Single (Participant)

Masking Description: The participant will not be aware of if they are receiving TMS treatment or sham TMS treatment.

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