Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Older Adults Using Citizen-science and Modern Technology

A Community-based Intervention to Increase Physical Activity Levels in Older Adults Using Citizen-science and Modern Technology

Sponsors

Lead Sponsor: University of Zurich

Source University of Zurich
Brief Summary

To develop and implement a physical activity promotion intervention for older adults with or without chronic disease living in an urban environment.

Detailed Description

The World Health organization recommends that all adults should aim for 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on at least five days of the week. The importance of physical activity for promoting heath is complicated when considering inactive older adults and chronic conditions. A problematic cycle emerges where physical inactivity increases the likelihood for developing chronic conditions, and, in turn, many chronic conditions are associated with symptoms that make physical activity more difficult.

The investigators aim to develop and implement a physical activity promotion intervention for older adults with or without chronic disease living in an urban environment that considers individual, interpersonal and environmental factors and makes use of a citizen-science approach and modern PA-monitoring devices.

Overall Status Completed
Start Date May 2016
Completion Date June 2017
Primary Completion Date June 2017
Phase N/A
Study Type Interventional
Primary Outcome
Measure Time Frame
Physical activity as the average daily number of steps Change from baseline to 6 months
Secondary Outcome
Measure Time Frame
Physical activity intensity Change from baseline to 6 months
Exercise capacity (1-minute sit-to-stand test) Change from baseline to 6 months
Health-related quality of life Change from baseline to 6 months
Symptoms of anxiety and depression Change from baseline to 6 months
Health status Change from baseline to 6 months
Perceived social support Change from baseline to 6 months
Enrollment 29
Condition
Intervention

Intervention Type: Behavioral

Intervention Name: Physical activity intervention

Description: The intervention is comprised of 5 steps: Goal setting: Over a step-counter (smartphone app) participants learn about their daily average step count. They are coached to set individual goals Fitness assessment: To recommend suitable frequency and intensity of walking program using mapped trails Structured walking groups: Promoted and communicated via app. Participants can additionally organize walking groups of their own. Feedback: Participants will see individual and group data over the step-counter app, and they can communicate with others via a communication app. They will be incentivized to reach goals through a gamification approach. Invite friends: After 12 weeks, participants are encouraged to invite people who fulfil the inclusion criteria to join the project

Arm Group Label: Physical activity intervention

Eligibility

Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria:

- Age 60 years or older

- Living within or <5km from Wetzikon (Zurich area)

- Understand and speak German

- Number of repetitions in the 1-min sit-to-stand test below the 75th percentile compared to the Swiss population (age and sex-specific reference values)

Exclusion Criteria:

- Symptomatic / unstable cardiovascular disease

- Cardiac surgery within one year

Gender: All

Minimum Age: 60 Years

Maximum Age: N/A

Healthy Volunteers: Accepts Healthy Volunteers

Overall Official
Last Name Role Affiliation
Milo Puhan, Prof. Dr. Principal Investigator EBPI, University of Zurich
Location
Facility: University of Zurich
Location Countries

Switzerland

Verification Date

August 2017

Responsible Party

Type: Sponsor

Has Expanded Access No
Number Of Arms 1
Arm Group

Label: Physical activity intervention

Type: Experimental

Description: Participants undergo the community-based physical activity promotion (see Intervention)

Patient Data Undecided
Study Design Info

Allocation: N/A

Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment

Primary Purpose: Other

Masking: None (Open Label)

Source: ClinicalTrials.gov